blèren

gallskrika

Nederlands-Zweeds woordenboek. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • blare — I. verb (blared; blaring) Etymology: Middle English bleren; akin to Middle Dutch blēren to shout Date: 15th century intransitive verb to sound loud and strident < radios blaring > transitive verb 1. to sound or utter raucously …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • List of English words of Dutch origin — This is a list of words of Dutch language origin. However, note that this list does also include some words of which the etymology is uncertain, and that some may have been derived from Middle Low German equivalents instead or as well. Some of… …   Wikipedia

  • plärren — Vsw std. stil. (13. Jh.), mhd. blerren, blēren Stammwort. Lautmalend wie mndl. bleren blöken . ✎ Hauschild, O. ZDW 12 (1910), 35, 39; Glombik Hujer, H. DWEB 5 (1968), 137 141. deutsch d …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • blare — (v.) late 14c., bleren to wail, possibly from an unrecorded O.E. *blæren, or from M.Du. bleren to bleat, cry, bawl, shout. Probably echoic, either way. Related: Blared; blaring. As a noun from 1809, from the verb …   Etymology dictionary

  • Blear — Blear, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bleared}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blearing}.] [OE. bleren; cf. Dan. plire to blink, Sw. plira to twinkle, wink, LG. plieren; perh. from the same root as E. blink. See {Blink}, and cf. {Blur}.] To make somewhat sore or watery …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bleared — Blear Blear, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bleared}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blearing}.] [OE. bleren; cf. Dan. plire to blink, Sw. plira to twinkle, wink, LG. plieren; perh. from the same root as E. blink. See {Blink}, and cf. {Blur}.] To make somewhat sore or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Blearing — Blear Blear, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bleared}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blearing}.] [OE. bleren; cf. Dan. plire to blink, Sw. plira to twinkle, wink, LG. plieren; perh. from the same root as E. blink. See {Blink}, and cf. {Blur}.] To make somewhat sore or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To blear the eye of — Blear Blear, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bleared}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blearing}.] [OE. bleren; cf. Dan. plire to blink, Sw. plira to twinkle, wink, LG. plieren; perh. from the same root as E. blink. See {Blink}, and cf. {Blur}.] To make somewhat sore or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • blear — I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English bleren, probably from Old English *blerian; akin to Low German bleer oged bleary eyed Date: 14th century 1. to make (the eyes) sore or watery 2. dim, blur II. adjective Date: 14th century …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • blur — I. noun Etymology: perhaps akin to Middle English bleren to blear Date: 1519 1. a smear or stain that obscures 2. something vaguely or indistinctly perceived; especially something moving or occurring too quickly to be clearly perceived II. verb… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • blare — /blair/, v., blared, blaring, n. v.i. 1. to emit a loud, raucous sound: The trumpets blared as the procession got under way. v.t. 2. to sound loudly; proclaim noisily: We sat there horrified as the radio blared the awful news. n. 3. a loud,… …   Universalium

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